Osa (Ocvsa), living with the essence of nature

osa- living with nature in ocvsa

PHOTOGRAPHY ANDY KARNITZ

AUTHOR: KEVIN CHAMPAGNE 

The spirit of Osa is influenced by the Boruca, who is the main indigenous tribe of this region. The highest historical status of their tribe, the Chief of Ocvsa, became the eponym of this South Pacific province. Boruca elders continue to keep their oral culture alive, telling myths and legends that point to the roots of their connection to nature.

For the last 10 years, my office has gifted the beautiful, hand-carved masks of the Boruca to home buyers. I feel that Osa is a sacred place best represented by the stories of those who have lived here the longest.

Indigenous people were the first wildlife experts in Osa. Through close observation of their frequent encounters with flora and fauna, they built extensive mythology that is still well preserved and used today.

Agrarian families in Osa grow crops of rice, beans, cacao, corn, tomatoes, and fruit trees up and down the mountainous landscape

They farm animals and harvest plants for medicine. They grow enough food to feed their families and maybe a little bit extra to sell at a farmer’s market or roadside stall. They have learned how to work this land over generations. Being surrounded by this more natural way of life is what keeps Osa so clean and green.

The spectacular and diverse ecosystems found within Osa are likely what drew the first nature lovers to settle t his region. It has a unique geological history that makes it home to a nearly unparalleled amount of biodiversity. This small corner of Costa Rica is where you can find 2.5% of the world’s total biodiversity across less than 1/1000th of the world’s landmass. It is one of the last places in Costa Rica to have been settled and continues to be sparsely populated, covered largely in magnificent virgin rainforest.

ocvsa- living with nature in osa

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDY KARNITZ

Osa has the most significant wetland ecosystem and mangrove forests of Central America. On land, you will find the largest remaining tract of lowland forests in Pacific Mesoamerica. Around 2-3% of the flora in Osa is found nowhere else in the world. And there are more species of trees in this region than in all of the Northern temperate regions combined.

My personal favorite thing about this natural wonderland called Osa is that it provides us with clean air, drinking water, food, jobs, a strong ecological culture, and a stable climate (you only need one wardrobe to live here!)

You can travel to a number of different environments in one day and experience a variety of transformative sensations, from swimming in crystal clear waterfalls to sunning on the soft sand of this region’s nearly vacant beaches. There is quite possibly no other place in the world that is this perfect to both live in and enjoy.

If you long to be one of the lucky ones who call Osa their home, I invite you to contact my office with any questions you have about how to make this irresistible idea a possibility for you, too.

What to do, Where to eat and Where to stay…

South Pacific Costa Rica Beaches

Looking for business directories, maps or other printouts? We’ve got that too!

Dare to Discover and Enjoy…

Check out…

Need help planning your next trip to Costa Rica? We look forward to help you!

Email: [email protected]
Phone: +(506) 8946 7134 or +(506) 8914 1568
Skype: ballenatalestravel

Ventanas Beach 1

Ventanas Beach

What a beautiful spot. You will now understand why people love this secluded beach, surrounded by lush rainforest and lined with palm trees. It mostly has calm waves. The shallow waters are safe for children (always under their parents’ observation and paying attention to the lifeguards’ alerts.)

Continue reading
local economy - economía local

How YOU can help the local economy

Indeed, most of the Costa Ballena region is dependent on tourism. Given that as the background, we hear from our homeowners, clients, and the social media channels: What can we do to help with the local economy?

Continue reading
Where does your native timber come from?

Where does your native timber come from?

Most of the construction on the Costa Ballena and Osa Peninsula is done by hotels and second-home builders drawn by the lush rainforest. Native timber feels like an obvious choice: who doesn’t love a handcrafted Cristobal door’s luxury?

Continue reading
travels by bicycle

In Osa the history travels by bicycle

It is an exhibition with identity, designed by and for the inhabitants of the Osa Canton. It is a temporary exhibition “In Osa history travels by bicycle,” which you can admire at the Finca 6 Museum site, in Palmar Sur.

Continue reading
teenage monkeys, monos adolescentes

The Strange Behavior of a Gang of Teenage Monkeys

The whole gang of teenage monkeys turned tail, ran for the fig tree, scuffled for a position, and ascended to the crown. Once safe from the mother raccoon, they seemed to lose interest in her, like a person trying to forget an embarrassing incident and pretending it never happened. The monkeys returned to their vagrant behavior, and mama continued about her business with her cubs at her side.

Continue reading
Posted in animals, Arquitectura y Construcción, community, Discover South Pacific, Osa and tagged , , , , , .